Strategies

Policies and programs that work

19 Strategies
Clear all

Allied dental professional scope of practice

Expand the role of allied dental professionals (e.g., hygienists, therapists, etc.) via changes to statute, dentist supervision requirements, etc.
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care

Community health workers

Engage professional or lay health workers to provide education, referral and follow-up, case management, home visiting, etc. for those at high risk for poor health outcomes; also called promotores de salud
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care

Employee Assistance Programs (EAP)

Provide confidential worksite-based counseling and referrals to employees to address personal and workplace challenges
Some Evidence
  • Employment
  • Family and Social Support

GED certificate programs

Implement programs that help individuals without a high school diploma or its equivalent achieve a General Education Development (GED) certificate
Some Evidence
  • Education
  • Employment

Health insurance enrollment outreach & support

Provide health insurance outreach and support to assist individuals whose employers do not offer affordable coverage, who are self-employed, or who are unemployed
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care

Health literacy interventions

Increase patients’ health-related knowledge via efforts to simplify health education materials, improve patient-provider communication, and increase overall literacy
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care
  • Quality of Care

Long-acting reversible contraception access

Increase access to LARCs through cost reduction, comprehensive birth control counseling, provider training, efforts to ensure availability at local clinics, etc.
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care
  • Sexual Activity

Mentoring for new nurses

Pair new nurses with more experienced nurses who act as a resource and provide support as the new nurse establishes her or himself professionally
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care

Mobile health for mental health

Deliver health care services and support to individuals with mental health concerns via mobile devices using text messaging or mobile applications (apps)
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care

Mobile reproductive health clinics

Offer reproductive health services (e.g., pregnancy tests, prenatal and postpartum care, gynecological exams, STI screenings, etc.), health education, and social service referrals via medically equipped vans
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care

Nurse residency programs

Implement programs that continue education, mentoring, and support for novice nurses following graduation
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care

Paid sick leave laws

Require employers in an affected jurisdiction to provide paid time off for employees to use when ill or injured
Some Evidence
  • Employment

Preconception education interventions

Provide women with information about the risks and benefits of behaviors that affect their health before, during, and after pregnancy
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care

Sector-based workforce initiatives

Provide industry-focused education and job training based on the needs of regional employers within specific sectors
Some Evidence
  • Employment

Summer youth employment programs

Provide short-term employment opportunities for youth, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds
Some Evidence
  • Community Safety
  • Employment

Telecommuting

Allow employees to work outside a central office, using technology to interact with others inside and outside the organization; also called remote work, telework, or flexible working arrangements
Some Evidence
  • Employment

Telemental health services

Provide mental health care services (e.g., psychotherapy or counseling) via telephone or videoconference
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care