Strategies

Policies and programs that work

10 Strategies
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Adult vocational training

Support acquisition of job-specific skills through education, certification programs, or on-the-job training, often with personal development resources and other supports
Scientifically Supported
  • Employment

Comprehensive risk reduction sexual education

Provide information about contraception and protection against sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in classroom or community settings
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Condom availability programs

Provide condoms free of charge or at a reduced cost in community and school-based settings
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Expedited partner therapy for treatable STIs

Provide prescriptions or medications to patients diagnosed with treatable STIs to give to their partners without provider visits; also called patient-delivered partner therapy (PDPT)
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Flexible scheduling

Offer employees control over an aspect of their schedule through arrangements such as flex time, flex hours, compressed work weeks, or self-scheduled shift work
Scientifically Supported
  • Employment

HIV/STI partner notification by providers

Elicit information about sex or needle-sharing partners from STI-positive patients, then notify partners of risk, testing, and services; also called contact tracing, or partner counseling and referral services
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Paid family leave

Provide employees with paid time off for circumstances such as a recent birth or adoption, a parent or spouse with a serious medical condition, or a sick child
Scientifically Supported
  • Employment

Transitional jobs

Establish time-limited, subsidized, paid job opportunities to provide a bridge to unsubsidized employment
Scientifically Supported
  • Employment