Strategies

Policies and programs that work

47 Strategies
Clear all

Adult vocational training

Support acquisition of job-specific skills through education, certification programs, or on-the-job training, often with personal development resources and other supports
Scientifically Supported
  • Employment

Alcohol brief interventions

Provide information and increase motivation to change or prevent problematic alcohol consumption in a short session; also called alcohol screening & brief intervention
Scientifically Supported
  • Alcohol and Drug Use

Alcohol outlet density restrictions

Limit increases in the number and concentration of alcohol outlets by area or by population through licensing or zoning regulations
Scientifically Supported
  • Alcohol and Drug Use
  • Community Safety

Alcohol taxes

Increase the price of alcohol via regular adjustments to taxes levied for beer, wine, and liquor purchases
Scientifically Supported
  • Alcohol and Drug Use

Behavioral health primary care integration

Revise health care processes and provider roles to integrate mental health and substance abuse treatment into primary care; continue to refer patients with severe conditions to specialty care
Scientifically Supported
  • Quality of Care

Behavioral interventions to prevent HIV and other STIs

Use individual, group, and community-level interventions to provide education, support, and training that can affect social norms about HIV and other STIs
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Blood alcohol concentration laws

Set legal limits for drivers’ blood alcohol concentrations (BACs)
Scientifically Supported
  • Alcohol and Drug Use

Breath testing checkpoints

Implement checkpoints where law enforcement officers can stop drivers suspected of drinking and driving and assess their level of alcohol impairment; also called sobriety checkpoints
Scientifically Supported
  • Alcohol and Drug Use

Case-managed care for community-dwelling frail elders

Use a case management model for frail elderly patients living independently, coordinating aspects of long-term care (LTC) such as status assessment, monitoring, advocacy, care planning, etc.
Scientifically Supported
  • Quality of Care