Strategies

Policies and programs that work

9 Strategies
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Adult vocational training

Support acquisition of job-specific skills through education, certification programs, or on-the-job training, often with personal development resources and other supports
Scientifically Supported
  • Employment

Flexible scheduling

Offer employees control over an aspect of their schedule through arrangements such as flex time, flex hours, compressed work weeks, or self-scheduled shift work
Scientifically Supported
  • Employment

Internet-based tobacco cessation interventions

Use websites, computer programs, and other electronic means to provide information, strategies, or behavioral support to tobacco users who want to quit, sometimes with counseling or pharmacotherapy
Scientifically Supported
  • Tobacco Use

Paid family leave

Provide employees with paid time off for circumstances such as a recent birth or adoption, a parent or spouse with a serious medical condition, or a sick child
Scientifically Supported
  • Employment

Smoke-free policies for indoor areas

Implement private sector rules or public sector regulations that prohibit smoking indoors or restrict it to designated, often outdoor, areas
Scientifically Supported
  • Tobacco Use

Tobacco cessation therapy affordability

Reduce patients’ out-of-pocket costs for cessation therapies such as nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and cessation counseling participation
Scientifically Supported
  • Tobacco Use

Transitional jobs

Establish time-limited, subsidized, paid job opportunities to provide a bridge to unsubsidized employment
Scientifically Supported
  • Employment

Value-based insurance design

Create financial incentives or remove financial disincentives to affect consumer choices and incentivize provision of cost efficient health care services
Scientifically Supported
  • Quality of Care