Strategies

Policies and programs that work

17 Strategies
Clear all

Behavioral interventions to prevent HIV and other STIs

Use individual, group, and community-level interventions to provide education, support, and training that can affect social norms about HIV and other STIs
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Breastfeeding promotion programs

Provide education, information, counseling, and support for breastfeeding to women throughout pre- and post-natal care
Scientifically Supported
  • Diet and Exercise

Condom availability programs

Provide condoms free of charge or at a reduced cost in community and school-based settings
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Exercise prescriptions

Provide patients with prescriptions for exercise plans, often accompanied by progress checks at office visits, counseling, activity logs, and exercise testing
Scientifically Supported
  • Diet and Exercise

Expedited partner therapy for treatable STIs

Provide prescriptions or medications to patients diagnosed with treatable STIs to give to their partners without provider visits; also called patient-delivered partner therapy (PDPT)
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Healthy home environment assessments

Train volunteers, professionals, or paraprofessionals to help residents assess and remediate environmental home health risks and recommend low cost changes (e.g., improved ventilation, integrated pest management, etc.)
Scientifically Supported
  • Housing and Transit

HIV/STI partner notification by providers

Elicit information about sex or needle-sharing partners from STI-positive patients, then notify partners of risk, testing, and services; also called contact tracing, or partner counseling and referral services
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Household lead control education interventions

Inform parents about lead exposure pathways and cleaning and hygiene techniques and undertake minor repairs or specialized cleaning
Evidence of Ineffectiveness
  • Housing and Transit