Strategies

Policies and programs that work

14 Strategies
Clear all

Behavioral interventions to prevent HIV and other STIs

Use individual, group, and community-level interventions to provide education, support, and training that can affect social norms about HIV and other STIs
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

CenteringPregnancy

Provide prenatal care in a group setting, integrating health assessment, education, and support
Scientifically Supported
  • Access to Care

Condom availability programs

Provide condoms free of charge or at a reduced cost in community and school-based settings
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Expedited partner therapy for treatable STIs

Provide prescriptions or medications to patients diagnosed with treatable STIs to give to their partners without provider visits; also called patient-delivered partner therapy (PDPT)
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Federally qualified health centers (FQHCs)

Increase support for non-profit health care organizations and deliver comprehensive care to uninsured, underinsured, and vulnerable patients regardless of ability to pay; often called community health centers (CHCs)
Scientifically Supported
  • Access to Care

HIV/STI partner notification by providers

Elicit information about sex or needle-sharing partners from STI-positive patients, then notify partners of risk, testing, and services; also called contact tracing, or partner counseling and referral services
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Medical homes

Provide continuous, comprehensive, whole person primary care that uses a coordinated team of medical providers across the health care system
Scientifically Supported
  • Quality of Care
  • Access to Care

Mental health benefits legislation

Regulate mental health insurance to increase access to mental health services, including treatment for substance use disorders
Scientifically Supported
  • Access to Care