Strategies

Policies and programs that work

48 Strategies
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Activity programs for older adults

Offer group educational, social, creative, musical, or physical activities that promote social interactions, regular attendance, and community involvement among older adults
Evidence Rating:
Scientifically Supported
  • Diet and Exercise
  • Family and Social Support

Baby bonds

Establish publicly funded investment accounts for every newborn, accessible at age 18
Evidence Rating:
Expert Opinion
  • Income

Child care subsidies

Provide financial assistance to working parents, or parents attending school, to pay for child care
Evidence Rating:
Scientifically Supported
  • Income

Child development accounts

Build assets through child development accounts (CDAs) with contributions from a sponsoring organization, such as government agencies or nonprofits, and family, friends; also called children’s savings accounts (CSAs)
Evidence Rating:
Expert Opinion
  • Income
  • Education

Child tax credit expansion

Expand federal or state child tax credits by increasing credit amounts, making credits refundable, decreasing or eliminating the earnings threshold, or creating a fully refundable supplement
Evidence Rating:
Expert Opinion
  • Income

Community arts programs

Support locally-based visual, media, and performing arts initiatives for children and adults; also called participatory arts programs
Evidence Rating:
Expert Opinion
  • Family and Social Support

Community centers

Support community venues that facilitate local residents’ efforts to socialize, participate in recreational or educational activities, gain information, and seek counseling or support services
Evidence Rating:
Expert Opinion
  • Family and Social Support

Crisis lines

Provide free and confidential counseling and service referrals via telephone-based conversation, web-based chat, or text message to individuals in crisis, particularly those with severe mental health concerns
Evidence Rating:
Some Evidence
  • Family and Social Support

Cross-age youth peer mentoring

Establish an ongoing relationship between an older youth or young adult and a younger child or adolescent, usually an elementary or middle school student
Evidence Rating:
Some Evidence
  • Family and Social Support