Strategies

Policies and programs that work

26 Strategies
Clear all

Adult vocational training

Support acquisition of job-specific skills through education, certification programs, or on-the-job training, often with personal development resources and other supports
Scientifically Supported
  • Employment

Ban the Box

Prohibit criminal history questions on job applications and postpone background checks
Mixed Evidence
  • Employment

Big Brothers Big Sisters (BBBS)

Match disadvantaged or at-risk youth with volunteer mentors in school or community settings
Some Evidence
  • Community Safety
  • Education

Bridge programs for hard-to-employ adults

Provide basic skills (e.g., reading, math, writing, English language, or soft skills) and industry-specific training with other supports; also called occupationally contextualized basic education programs
Expert Opinion
  • Education
  • Employment

Car seat incentive & education programs

Educate parents and caregivers about proper use of car seats and reward parents and/or children for correct use
Scientifically Supported
  • Community Safety

Career pathways programs

Provide occupation-specific training for low-skilled individuals in high-growth industries, with education and supports, usually with stackable credentials and work experience opportunities
Expert Opinion
  • Employment

Child bicycle helmet promotion programs

Promote child bicycle helmet use via bicycle safety education, media campaigns, or provision of free or subsidized helmets
Scientifically Supported
  • Community Safety

Financial incentives for new nursing faculty

Offer loan repayment, tuition assistance, competitive academic salaries, etc. to students who teach in nursing programs after completing an advanced degree
Expert Opinion
  • Access to Care

Functional Family Therapy (FFT)

Introduce a short-term family-based intervention therapy focused on strengths, protective factors and risk factors for youth with delinquency, violence, or substance abuse problems, and their families
Scientifically Supported
  • Community Safety

GED certificate programs

Implement programs that help individuals without a high school diploma or its equivalent achieve a General Education Development (GED) certificate
Some Evidence
  • Education
  • Employment