Strategies

Policies and programs that work

21 Strategies
Clear all

Behavioral interventions to prevent HIV and other STIs

Use individual, group, and community-level interventions to provide education, support, and training that can affect social norms about HIV and other STIs
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Community health workers

Engage professional or lay health workers to provide education, referral and follow-up, case management, home visiting, etc. for those at high risk for poor health outcomes; also called promotores de salud
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care

Comprehensive risk reduction sexual education

Provide information about contraception and protection against sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in classroom or community settings
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Condom availability programs

Provide condoms free of charge or at a reduced cost in community and school-based settings
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Faith community nursing

Position registered nurses within a parish or similar faith community, or in a health care system to serve as a liaison to congregations; also called parish nursing or congregational nursing
Expert Opinion
  • Access to Care

Grady Memorial Hospital Interpregnancy Care Program

Provided case management, care coordination, medical care, and substance abuse treatment and referrals to black women who had recently delivered a very low birthweight infant in the Atlanta area
Expert Opinion
  • Access to Care

Health insurance enrollment outreach & support

Provide health insurance outreach and support to assist individuals whose employers do not offer affordable coverage, who are self-employed, or who are unemployed
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care

Health literacy interventions

Increase patients’ health-related knowledge via efforts to simplify health education materials, improve patient-provider communication, and increase overall literacy
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care
  • Quality of Care

Healthy Births for Healthy Communities

Provided case management, medical care, reproductive education, a medical home, and help with reproductive and self-management goals in the 18 months after an adverse birth outcome for Chicago-area women
Insufficient Evidence
  • Access to Care