Strategies

Policies and programs that work

12 Strategies
Clear all

Alcohol advertising restrictions

Restrict the content and placement of alcohol advertisements on broadcasts, outdoor displays, internet marketing, etc. via state laws, local ordinances, industry self-regulation, or a combination of efforts
Some Evidence
  • Alcohol and Drug Use

Consumer-directed health plans

Establish high deductible health plans paired with pre-tax medical expense accounts such as Health Reimbursement Arrangements (HRAs) or Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) and information tools
Mixed Evidence
  • Quality of Care

Naloxone education & distribution programs

Support community members who are likely to encounter individuals who might overdose with education and training to administer naloxone and ensure all first responders are trained and authorized to administer naloxone
Some Evidence
  • Alcohol and Drug Use

Patient financial incentives for preventive care

Use payments, vouchers, and other incentives to encourage patients to undergo preventive care such as screenings, vaccinations, etc.
Scientifically Supported
  • Quality of Care

Patient shared decision making

Support joint decision making between health care practitioners and patients through shared decision making (SDM); part of patient-centered care
Scientifically Supported
  • Quality of Care

Prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs)

Use databases, housed in state agencies, to track prescribing and dispensing of Schedule II, III, IV, and V drugs and other controlled substances
Some Evidence
  • Alcohol and Drug Use

Price transparency initiatives for patients

Make pricing for hospital procedures and other health care services publicly available, often via websites, online databases, report cards, or similar tools
Some Evidence
  • Quality of Care

Responsible beverage server training (RBS/RBST)

Educate owners, managers, servers, and sellers at alcohol establishments about strategies to avoid illegally selling alcohol to underage youth or intoxicated patrons
Some Evidence
  • Alcohol and Drug Use

Tiered drug formularies

Vary patient drug costs by tier; e.g., generic drugs have the lowest co-pay or cost sharing in tier one, then preferred brand name medications (tier two), then non-formulary drugs (tier three)
Mixed Evidence
  • Quality of Care