Strategies

Policies and programs that work

8 Strategies
Clear all

Consumer-directed health plans

Establish high deductible health plans paired with pre-tax medical expense accounts such as Health Reimbursement Arrangements (HRAs) or Health Savings Accounts (HSAs) and information tools
Evidence Rating:
Mixed Evidence
  • Quality of Care

Financial education for adults

Provide one-on-one or group adult education programs that cover topics such as basic budgeting, bank use, credit management, bankruptcy, credit building and counseling, homeownership, retirement, divorce, etc.
Evidence Rating:
Insufficient Evidence
  • Income

Healthy Births for Healthy Communities

Provided case management, medical care, reproductive education, a medical home, and help with reproductive and self-management goals in the 18 months after an adverse birth outcome for Chicago-area women
Evidence Rating:
Insufficient Evidence
  • Access to Care

Hospital wristband color standardization

Establish national standards for the colors of patient wristbands used to alert health care providers about specific conditions such as allergies or elevated fall risk
Evidence Rating:
Insufficient Evidence
  • Quality of Care

J-1 physician visa waivers

Expand use of J-1 physician visa waivers for foreign-born physicians who have trained in the US and will serve patients in designated Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSAs)
Evidence Rating:
Insufficient Evidence
  • Access to Care

Secondhand smoke education interventions

Use counseling, informational materials, etc. to inform smokers and non-smokers of the harms of secondhand smoke and encourage them to implement home smoking bans
Evidence Rating:
Mixed Evidence
  • Tobacco Use

Tiered drug formularies

Vary patient drug costs by tier; e.g., generic drugs have the lowest co-pay or cost sharing in tier one, then preferred brand name medications (tier two), then non-formulary drugs (tier three)
Evidence Rating:
Mixed Evidence
  • Quality of Care

Tobacco cessation contests

Encourage participants to quit using tobacco on a set date or during a specific time period and give successful participants a chance to win financial rewards or other prizes; often called Quit & Win contests
Evidence Rating:
Insufficient Evidence
  • Tobacco Use