Strategies

Policies and programs that work

24 Strategies
Clear all

Community health workers

Engage professional or lay health workers to provide education, referral and follow-up, case management, home visiting, etc. for those at high risk for poor health outcomes; also called promotores de salud
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care

E-cigarette regulations

Regulate use of e-cigarettes, especially among youth, via age restrictions, marketing restrictions, expanded smoke-free policies, etc.
Expert Opinion
  • Tobacco Use

Federally qualified health centers (FQHCs)

Increase support for non-profit health care organizations and deliver comprehensive care to uninsured, underinsured, and vulnerable patients regardless of ability to pay; often called community health centers (CHCs)
Scientifically Supported
  • Access to Care

Internet-based tobacco cessation interventions

Use websites, computer programs, and other electronic means to provide information, strategies, or behavioral support to tobacco users who want to quit, sometimes with counseling or pharmacotherapy
Scientifically Supported
  • Tobacco Use

Mass media campaigns against tobacco use

Use broad media-based efforts to educate large groups of current and potential tobacco users about the dangers of tobacco use
Scientifically Supported
  • Tobacco Use

Medical homes

Provide continuous, comprehensive, whole person primary care that uses a coordinated team of medical providers across the health care system
Scientifically Supported
  • Quality of Care
  • Access to Care

Minimum tobacco age laws

Increase the minimum legal tobacco age to purchase or publicly consume tobacco to 21; also called Tobacco 21
Expert Opinion
  • Tobacco Use

School-based health centers

Provide health care services on school premises to attending elementary, middle, and high school students; services provided by teams of nurses, nurse practitioners, and physicians
Scientifically Supported
  • Education
  • Access to Care