Strategies

Policies and programs that work

17 Strategies
Clear all

Community health workers

Engage professional or lay health workers to provide education, referral and follow-up, case management, home visiting, etc. for those at high risk for poor health outcomes; also called promotores de salud
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care

Comprehensive risk reduction sexual education

Provide information about contraception and protection against sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in classroom or community settings
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Condom availability programs

Provide condoms free of charge or at a reduced cost in community and school-based settings
Scientifically Supported
  • Sexual Activity

Faith community nursing

Position registered nurses within a parish or similar faith community, or in a health care system to serve as a liaison to congregations; also called parish nursing or congregational nursing
Expert Opinion
  • Access to Care

Federally qualified health centers (FQHCs)

Increase support for non-profit health care organizations and deliver comprehensive care to uninsured, underinsured, and vulnerable patients regardless of ability to pay; often called community health centers (CHCs)
Scientifically Supported
  • Access to Care

Media restrictions on sexual content

Reduce child and adolescent access to sexual content in television, movies, music, and videogames via rating systems, parental advisories, parental guidelines, etc.
Insufficient Evidence
  • Sexual Activity

Medical homes

Provide continuous, comprehensive, whole person primary care that uses a coordinated team of medical providers across the health care system
Scientifically Supported
  • Quality of Care
  • Access to Care

Mobile health for mental health

Deliver health care services and support to individuals with mental health concerns via mobile devices using text messaging or mobile applications (apps)
Some Evidence
  • Access to Care

Multi-component interventions: pregnancy and STIs

Support initiatives that combine classroom instruction, individual counseling, and broad community efforts to reduce pregnancy and STIs among youth
Some Evidence
  • Sexual Activity