2022 Nevada State Report

Introduction

County Health Rankings & Roadmaps (CHR&R) brings actionable data, evidence, guidance, and stories to diverse leaders and residents so people and communities can be healthier. The University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute created CHR&R for communities across the nation, with funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

This report will highlight how access to opportunity and economic security is both tied to residents' health and variable depending on their location within your state. 

Growing Healthy Places Means Ensuring Opportunities for All

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Group of elementary age children working on school projects outside at a picnic table on a sunny day.

Communities thrive when all people can be healthy in their neighborhoods, schools, and workplaces. CHR&R brings actionable data and strategies to communities working to ensure that healthy places are available to all. This report highlights how health outcomes and health factors differ by place within Nevada. We also outline how economic security – or the ability of individuals, households, and communities to meet basic needs with dignity – is important to health. We call attention to childcare cost burden as a barrier to economic security and health.

 

Growing Community Power to Improve Health and Equity 

The Take Action to Improve Health section of the CHR&R website helps communities find tools and guidance to take action, select evidence-informed strategies, and make lasting changes. Take Action to Improve Health is a hub for information to help improve a community’s health and foster health equity. Find resources including:

Using Data to Improve Health Equity 

Data show a persistent pattern across the country in barriers to opportunity for people with lower incomes and for people of color. Differences in the opportunities available to different groups of people are related to unfair policies and practices. 

Our progress toward health equity will be measured by how health disparities change over time. Explore our website to learn more about:

  1. Health outcome and factor measures for your state and county.
  2. Measures with data available by race and ethnicity to illuminate differences in opportunities for health.
  3. Additional data resources for Nevada that provide information about health and opportunity by age group, gender, and zip code.

What are Health Outcomes?

We measure length and quality of life to understand the health outcomes among counties in Nevada.

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Measures related to length of life and quality of life in the CHR&R model.

How Do Counties Rank for Health Outcomes?

The green map shows Nevada’s health outcome rankings by county. The map is divided into four quartiles with less color intensity indicating better health outcomes. Specific county ranks can be found in your Nevada state overview.

Find detailed information on the measures and their associated weights here. You can also learn about how we calculate health outcome ranks

What Do Differences Between Ranks Mean?

Counties are ordered by the health outcome rank, with a top-ranked county (rank = 1) having the best health outcome score. Ranks are good for sparking conversations, but they do not show differences in health within counties or describe the magnitude of difference in community health experienced between ranks. The chart next to the map shows the spread of health outcome scores (ranks) for each county (green circles) in Nevada. This graphic shows the size of the gaps between ranked counties. The background colors correspond to the four quartiles used in the map.

Figure 1. Health outcome ranks displayed using quartiles (map) and underlying health outcome scores (chart)

*Note: counties in gray are not ranked.

2022 Nevada Health Outcome Ranks and Scores

What are Health Factors?

Health factors represent community conditions that we can change to improve health and opportunity, such as access to quality education, living wage jobs, quality clinical care, nutritious foods, green spaces, and secure and affordable housing. We measure four health factor areas. 

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Measures related to health behaviors, clinical care, social and economic factors, and physical environment in the CHR&R model.

How Do Counties Rank for Health Factors?

The blue map shows Nevada’s health factor rankings by county. The map is divided into four quartiles with less color intensity indicating better health factors. Specific county ranks can be found in your Nevada state overview.

Find detailed information on the measures and their associated weights here. You can also learn about how we calculate health factor ranks

What Do Differences Between Ranks Mean?

Counties are ordered by the health factor rank, with a top-ranked county (rank = 1) having the best health factor score. The chart next to the map shows the spread of health factor scores (ranks) for each ranked county (blue circles) in Nevada. This graphic shows the size of the gaps between ranked counties. The background colors correspond to the four quartiles used in the map.

Figure 2. Health factor ranks displayed using quartiles (map) and underlying health factor scores (chart)

*Note: counties in gray are not ranked.

2022 Nevada Health Factor Ranks and Scores

Economic Security is Key to Thriving Communities

Economic security enables families to cover basic needs such as housing, education, childcare, food, and medical care. Each of these needs has demonstrated ties to health. However, economic security is not equally accessible to all people. When a single household expense consumes the majority of a paycheck, it becomes difficult to meet competing needs and can force households into tough decisions like choosing between quality childcare, paying rent, and purchasing nutritious food. Individuals, households, and communities deserve the opportunity to meet basic needs with dignity. Advancing a just recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic, and the layered impacts of racism and economic exclusion, requires intentional action to ensure all people and places have what they need to thrive. Check out policies and programs that can be implemented in your community at What Works for Health.

Childcare Cost Burden in Nevada and the U.S.

Childcare cost burden measures the percentage of household income needed to pay for childcare. When childcare is affordable and accessible, it can support parents’ and guardians’ ability to participate in paid work and can provide lifelong benefits to children. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ benchmark suggests childcare is no longer affordable if it exceeds 7% of a household’s income. This measure of childcare cost burden reflects the experience of a household with two children.

Childcare Cost Burden in Nevada Counties

The childcare cost burden exists among counties in Nevada and ranges from 20% to 37%.

In context: 
  • Similar levels of childcare cost burden exist across all levels of urbanization.
  • Median household income varies by race and ethnicity across Nevada counties, ranging from $42,047 for Black households to $70,521 for Asian households. These income disparities demonstrate how economic security is not equally accessible to all people living in Nevada. 
Figure 3. Childcare cost burden in Nevada by county
    Map of Nevada demonstrating differences in childcare cost burden by county

    Childcare Cost Burden Across the U.S.

    The typical cost burden of childcare among counties in the U.S. is about 25% of household income - meaning a quarter of every dollar earned goes to paying for childcare. Families in every state experience a childcare cost higher than the 7% federal benchmark of affordability. The childcare cost burden in Nevada is 30%.

    Figure 4. Childcare cost burden in the U.S. by state
    Childcare cost burden range in Nevada counties

    Interact with the data

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    2022 CHRR State Report Data Interactive

    Visualize the County Health Rankings measures of Median household income, Childcare cost burden, and Children in poverty by race and ethnicity groups or by county level of urbanization within a state.

     

    View the data interactive >

    Credits

    Suggested citation
    University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute. County Health Rankings State Report 2022.
    Report Authors

    Christine Muganda, PhD
    Jess Hoffelder, MPH
    Hannah Olson-Williams
    Keith Gennuso, PhD
    Marjory Givens, PhD, MSPH
    Sheri Johnson, PhD

    Research Assistance

    Jennifer Robinson
    Matthew Rodock, MPH
    Anne Roubal, PhD
    Ganhua Lu, PhD
    Molly Burdine
    Eunice Park, MIS
    Elizabeth Blomberg, PhD
    Nicholas Schmuhl, PhD
    Suryadewi Nugraheni, MD, MA, PhD

    With key contributions from:
    Michael Stevenson, MPH
    Lindsay Garber, MPA
    Beth Silver, MCM
    Cathy Vos
    and the entire County Health Rankings & Roadmaps Team

    Data collaboration:
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Dr. Amy Glasmeier, PhD and the Living Wage Calculator at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Communications & website support: 
    Burness 
    Forum One 

    This work is made possible with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.